Civilizations/Architecture in Muunfel

Because Muunfel is so varied in geography and peoples, this largely depends on the area you’re looking at. However, there are some common trends among certain locales. I’ll break these down by country.

Korvasin: With mainly fertile plains and flat or gently-hilled land, even the smaller towns have enough economy to build decent walls for defense. The buildings are a mix of wood and stone, and the streets usually meander – they don’t use grids. The biggest cities, like the capital in Divali, sport extremely high walls with multiple openings for defenses.

Rutan: The desert was once occupied by the Solians. Their cities remain in some places, with rounded buildings and advanced infrastructure like aqueducts throughout. The ruined cities are repaired with wood and newer stones in places, but are largely left unaltered. Colorful glass and tiered city levels are a theme with most large settlements in Rutan.

Genfierz: The landscape is more hilly and sometimes abrupt than other areas, but there are also several ruins of Solian cities in Gen. The Solians tended to either use grid patterns for their streets or radial patterns. The big difference between Rutan and Genfierz is that Genfierz is more friendly to technology, so it attracts more innovators, builders, and creatives, and thus the ruins are more modified with machines. Newer cities try to imitate the style of the old Solian cities, but with more consideration for building and invention.

Meraev: It is occupied by Solians, mostly, in separate clans consisting of a few families. These clans don’t often get together, and their settlements tend to differ to the tastes of the individual families. They don’t build large permanent settlements like the empire used to.

Faelands: Foresty wilds hide buildings and structures connected directly to the trees. The local fae tend to have an influence on how these clusters of buildings are organized and styled.

North: The people of the north are hardy and more familiar with war. They tend to build into the sides of cliffs, hills, or valleys so a lot of their architecture looks like it’s growing right out of the earth or being buried.

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